Category Archive: euthanasia

G. Frank Lydston on Lethal Chambers

As quoted in Against Their Will: The Secret History of Medical Experimentation on Children in Cold War America: Some eugenic proponents, such as Lewellys F. Barker and G. Frank Lydston, were not just directors of institutions but major names in the field of medicine.  Barker was the physician-in-chief at John Hopkins Hospital; Lydston, a professor …

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Galton: It will never come to lethal chambers!

After Francis Galton’s address to the American Sociological Society, “Eugenics: Its Definition, Scope, and Aims” a certain Benjamin Kidd responds thusly: For Mr. Pearson, I think, proposed to give the kind of people who now scribble on our railway carriages no more than a short shrift and the nearest lamp-post. I hope we shall not …

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“Eugenics: Its Definition, Scope, and Aims” by Francis Galton

One of the earliest, more definitive beginnings of the Eugenics movement, was this address given by Francis Galton.  Eugenics got its bad rap by its association with the Nazis.  Its important to observe that its most ardent proponents were Americans. “Eugenics: Its Definition, Scope, and Aims” by Francis Galton. Read before the Sociological Society at a …

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Foster Kennedy: Euthanasia for “Nature’s Mistakes” up to the age of 5

Kennedy’s address at the 97th annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in 1941 encapsulates well how the acceptance of evolution and utilitarian thinking are tied into arguments for eugenics (and euthanasia), which is ironic, of course, since many advocates for euthanasia deny such connections and modern proponents of evolution become apoplectic at the insinuation …

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The Minimum Wage As Means to Exterminate Defectives: Taussig, 1911

SOURCE: Frank Taussig, Principles of Economics, Volume II, 1911.  Pages 299-300. As with legislation on hours, factory conditions, and the like, a compulsory minimum wages rate might serve simply to regulate the plane of competition. All employers would be affected alike; no one could undersell the others by cutting below the established rate. There would …

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Eugenics Quote of the Day: ‘Put the Defectives in a Camp and Drown Them’, W.S. Main, Wisconsin State Senator

W.S. Main, Wisconsin state senator, speaking in 1890, as found in “Criminals and their Treatment”, in Proceedings of the Wisconsin Conference for 1890. Quoted in “Wisconsin Magazine of History, Spring 1960. If all these [hereditary criminals] could be marshalled into one great camp and with a mill stone around each of their necks, cast into …

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Eugenics Quote of the Day: ‘Defective (ie, ‘disabled’) people should not be allowed to reproduce for the good of the state.’ RZ Mason, mayor of Appleton, WI

R.Z. Mason, mayor of Appleton, WI, “The Duty of the State in its Treatment of the Deaf and Dumb, the Blind, the Idiotic, the Crippled and Deformed, and the Insane.” [Source] In the progress of modern civilization, the state has come slowly to a recognition of certain duties and obligations to these unfortunate classes.  At …

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The Duty of the State in the Treatment of the Deformed: R. Z. Mason, Appleton WI, 1879

R.Z. Mason, mayor of Appleton, WI, “The Duty of the State in its Treatment of the Deaf and Dumb, the Blind, the Idiotic, the Crippled and Deformed, and the Insane.” [Source / Italics added, bold text added] In the progress of modern civilization, the state has come slowly to a recognition of certain duties and …

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DH Lawrence pines for the lethal chamber for the sick and maimed (1908)

DH Lawrence in a letter to Blanche Jennings, October 9, 1908.  [Reference] If I had my way, I would build a lethal chamber as big as the Crystal Palace, with a military band playing softly, and a Cinematograph working brightly; then I’d go out in the back streets and main streets and bring them in, …

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Joseph Fletcher, A Right to Die; Down Syndrome people are not persons and OUGHT to be killed

[People] have no reason to feel guilty about putting a Down’s syndrome baby away, whether it’s “put away” in the sense of hidden in a sanitarium or in a more responsible lethal sense. It is sad; yes. Dreadful. But it carries no guilt. True guilt arises only from an offense against a person, and a Down’s is not a person.

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